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Soils for Life Blog

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Improving the Carbon Content of Soil

  last week's post for why that's important.   Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the main constituent of soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is formed by the biological, chemical and physical decay of organic materials on the soil surface and below the ground. On average, SOM is composed of 50% carbon, 40% oxygen, 3% nitrogen and smaller amounts of other elements as micronutrients. SOM varies in its stability. Some is labile, relatively quickly biodegradable, and other components are more stable (non-labile). The ratio of labile to non-labile depends on microbial conditions. As in nature, we can transform arid soils into ....

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Why 'Soils for Life'?

last week and you can understand how a good cover of vegetation helps hold the soil together in extreme weather events such as flooding or high winds, or conversely, how in dry times, covered soil full of organic matter remains moister for longer than exposed bare ground.   Healthy soils also support production – and not just for this or next season, but with the right investment, sustainably for the long term. Isn’t soil formation a ....

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The Regenerative Soil-Water-Vegetation Cycle

  Together in a natural system, soil, water and vegetation - supported by a constant flow of solar energy - provide a regenerative cycle. Improving landscape management practices can help to restore these natural systems, through which we can maximise water use efficiency, improve soil health, nutrient cycling and biodiversity of vegetation. In simple terms, a properly structured soil, with good levels of soil organic carbon, allows greater infiltration and retention of rainfall. Every gram of carbon in the soil can retain up to eight grams of water. By improving soil structure – particularly soil carbon levels – through increasing organic matter in ....

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About the Soils for Life Blog

Soils for Life aims to encourage and support the wide adoption of regenerative landscape management by Australian farmers and land managers. To achieve this, we seek out leading practice in landscape management - where positive economic, environmental and social outcomes have been achieved - and share these experiences to assist others. We'll use this blog to discuss what we've found and what these innovative farmers are doing. Hopefully we can de-mystify what are sometime still considered ‘fringe’ practices, and show that they are affordable, achievable, worth adopting – ....